Author: David Babuschkin
David was born and raised in Cologne, Germany to a Russian/Jewish family. He studied physics at undergraduate and Master's level at the University of Sussex. He currently works in R&D at Micron Semiconductor Ltd. He mainly writes about science and the philosophy of science. If you want to get in contact, drop him an email at [email protected]

Human memory boosted beyond natural capabilities with a brain implant

For the first time in history, an implant has been shown to boost human cognition beyond its natural capabilities, signaling the start of the era of “memory prosthesis”. Dr. Dong Song, the leader of a biomedical engineering team at the University of Southern California, presented his team’s findings at a meeting of the Society of of Neuroscience in Washington, DC. Read more...

What this ancient Babylonian tablet teaches us about the politics of discovery

Recent coverage of the Plimpton 322 has made inflated claims about the importance of its discovery – but does it hold up to scrutiny?
 
Artefact Plimpton 322 has been in the news lately – an ancient Babylonian clay tablet inscribed with numbers (now known as Pythagorean Triples) which has recently been hailed as a key unearthing in the existence of trigonometry. Read more...

Beyond the Woo – Why David Wolfe & Co. Are Detrimental to Society

In my last piece I discussed the methods David ‘Avocado’ Wolfe uses to attract followers, and spread his quackery. As I was writing it, I remember feeling overwhelmed with anger and a sense of disbelief thinking about how many people subscribe to his BS and how many people’s life choices are influenced by him – so much so, that I feel I didn’t properly explain why I believe David Wolfe and con-artists like him are so detrimental to society and would now like to take this opportunity to do so. Read more...

A short piece on Gravity

Gravity. Everyone knows about it, everyone experiences it, yet not many people know what it is. Don’t worry though – the scientific community is also not sure about this one. Even though gravity was the first fundamental force to be discovered and named, it is the one we know the least about (the others being the strong nuclear force, the weak nuclear force, and electromagnetism – if you’re interested in those, I suggest you google them). Read more...